WEBINARS

framing ageing webinars

Originally planned as two-day international conferences, these events have been reconfigured into a series of webinars.

Webinar 4 (Register here)

5 March 2021

15.00 to 16.50 GMT

Panel 6: Practise I

Chair: Anne Fuchs (University College Dublin)
Introductory words by Anne Fuchs

Hilary Moss (University of Limerick)
‘The role of the arts in the lives of older people before, during and after a hospital stay: aesthetic neglect or enrichments?’

Response: Tara Byrne, Age & Opportunity

Katie Featherstone (Cardiff University) ‘Wandering the Wards: Everyday hospital care and its consequences for people living with dementia’

Response: Ulla Kriebernegg (University of Graz)

Comfort Break

Desmond J Tobin (University College Dublin)
‘Our Ageing Skin – can we ever feel comfortable in it/ with it?’

Response: Robert Zwijnenberg (Leiden University)

Discussion

Panel 5: Methodologies

Part I

  • Julia Langbein (Trinity College Dublin):
    ‘M.E. Chevreul (1786-1889): Old Age and the Subject of Photography’
  • Gemma Carney (Queen’s University, Belfast)
    ’Old Age in the Age of Coronavirus – a qualitative media analysis’
  • David G. Troyansky (Brooklyn College and Graduate Center, CUNY):
    ‘J.R.’s ‘Wrinkles of the City’ project. Representing Global Old Age, 2008-2015’
  • Response: Susan Pickard

Part II

  • Ulla Kriebernegg (University of Graz):
    ‘Literary gerontology: Understanding ageing bodies and identities through cultural representation’
  • Robert Zwijnenberg (Leiden University): ‘Aging, the risk of life and the urgency of art’
  • Response: Dana Walrath
Click here for more information.
 
Humanities Institute

Previous webinars

Webinar 3

22 January 2021

15.00 to 17.15 GMT
Panel 5: Methodologies

Part I

  • Julia Langbein (Trinity College Dublin): Theorizing a Visual Culture of Old Age: The Case of Neoimpressionism
  • Gemma Carney (Queen’s University, Belfast)
    ’Old Age in the Age of Coronavirus – a qualitative media analysis’
  • David G. Troyansky (Brooklyn College and Graduate Center, CUNY):
    ‘J.R.’s ‘Wrinkles of the City’ project. Representing Global Old Age, 2008-2015’
  • Response: Susan Pickard

Part II

  • Ulla Kriebernegg (University of Graz):
    ‘Understanding ageing bodies and identities through cultural representation: A literary gerontological reading of Margaret Atwood’s “Torching the Dusties”‘
  • Robert Zwijnenberg (Leiden University): ‘Aging, the risk of life and the urgency of art’
  • Response: Dana Walrath
 

Webinar 2

15 December 2020

15.00 to 17.30 GMT

Panel 3: Narrating Gender and Ageing

  • Linda Shortt (University of Warwick):
    (Un)Fit Ageing: the Ageing Male in Hermann Kinder’s writings
  • Anne Fuchs (UCD Humanities Institute):
    The Inner Voice of Ageing Women: Elizabeth Strout’s Olive Kitteridge and Olive, Again
  • Mary Cosgrove (Trinity College Dublin):
    The Meaning of Middle Age in Contemporary German Literature

Panel 4: Memory and Experience

  • Aleida Assmann (University of Konstanz):
    Wisdom: a new concept for gerontology?
  • Zainabu Jallo (University of Bern):
    Ageing in Diaspora
  • Gillian Pye (University College Dublin):
    Happiness as emotional experience and narrative process in literary accounts of old age

Webinar 1

27 October  2020

A video of this webinar is now available to watch on our podcasts page.

Panel 1: Ageing Bodies and Identities

  • Rina Knoeff (University of Groningen): ‘Revisiting the centenarian cult: On
    the cultural significance of tales of exceptional old age’
  • Paul Higgs (University College London): ‘The ageing body and the social imaginary of the fourth age’
  • Julia Twigg (University of Kent): ‘Age, Dress and the Cultural Turn in Gerontology’

Panel 2: Gender, Subjectivity and Agency

  • Andrew King (University of Surrey) ‘Coming far, getting somewhere? The current
    concerns and future challenges facing older LGTB+ people’
  • Susan Pickard (University of Liverpool): ‘Last Love’
  • Wendy Martin (Brunel University): ‘Forever ‘Becoming’? Negotiating Gendered and Ageing Embodiment in Everyday Life’
Workshop documentation

reframing ageing Webinar

Covid-19 Reframing Ageing
Friday, 12 June 2020

There are many emerging stories in the global Covid-19 crisis, stories of sickness, death, lockdown, isolation, unemployment, alongside stories of human resilience, solidarity and hope for sustainability, social inclusion and fairness.

However, from an early point, the discourse on older people was controversial and troubling. While the intent was to protect vulnerable cohorts from infection, this well-intended policy resulted in severely restricted freedom and mobility over an extended period of time, causing mental and other health issues.

Against this backdrop our webinar on C19 asked what are the blind spots and biases that Covid-19 has revealed in public discourse, political rhetoric and narratives of experience?

Contributors: Ailbhe Smyth, Thomas Scharf, Ulla Kriebernegg, Paul Higgs, Dana Walrath, Andrew King, Susan Pickard, Rina Knoeff.

Chairs: Professor Anne Fuchs (Humanities Institute UCD), Professor Des O’Neill (Royal College of Surgeons/TCD), Professor Mary Cosgrove (TCD), Dr Julia Langbein (TCD).

The chairs have compiled a report on the webinar which is now available to download. Click here to read the report.